PT Health Life

Are hemangiomas in the liver dangerous?

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PT Health Life – Hemangioma in the liver is a congenital vascular malformation and is the most common benign tumor in the liver, with a rate of 0.4 – 20% on ultrasound and on experimental surgery. They are congenital in origin and are rarely cancerous.

1. What is liver hemangioma? Is hemangioma in the liver dangerous?

Hepatic hemangioma is a benign tumor in the liver, created from a tangle of blood vessels in the liver or tangled liver surface. The disease has no risk of developing into cancer. Among them, the rate of women suffering from the disease is higher than that of men.

Hemangioma can be a mass or multiple masses, usually small in size, no more than 5cm, often appearing in the right liver and under the liver capsule. Hemangiomas in the liver often have no symptoms, so they are difficult to detect. They are often discovered accidentally when you have a health check, CT scan or ultrasound.

Small-sized hemangiomas in the liver are not dangerous to health, but if these tumors grow larger, they will cause complications that affect the patient. For pregnant women, increased levels of the female hormone estrogen will cause the hemangioma to grow larger, the hemangioma to spread, and they will face many complications, of which  liver damage is the most obvious complication in pregnant women. The patient has a hemangioma in the liver.

Hemangioma in the liver is a congenital vascular malformation and is the most common benign tumor in the liver, with a rate of 0.4 – 20% on ultrasound and on experimental surgery.

Simply because when tumors appear in the liver, its function of eliminating toxins will be greatly affected, thereby, the patient’s health will decline.

2. Symptoms of hemangioma in the liver

Clinical symptoms of liver tumors are often poor and non-specific:

  • Right lower quadrant pain is due to the tumor causing stretching of the glisson capsule or compression.
  • Eat poorly, lose weight.
  • Rarely, there are symptoms of biliary obstruction due to tumor compression of the bile duct.
  • Rarely, some patients come to the hospital because of complications of the tumor, such as tumor rupture causing intra-abdominal bleeding, tumor necrosis causing fever and severe pain, or sometimes an abscess causing peritonitis.

Physical symptoms:

  • The liver is enlarged due to the large size of the tumor.
  • Anemia: rare, when a tumor ruptures causing bleeding or a large tumor causes bleeding within the tumor.
  • Jaundice syndrome due to biliary obstruction occurs when the tumor is large in size and causes compression of the bile ducts.
  • Some patients come to the hospital for routine health check-ups or other organ diseases and accidentally discover liver tumors without any previous symptoms.

3. Treatment of hemangioma in the liver

Most people do not need treatment. In many cases a liver hemangioma will never develop and will never cause problems. You can schedule follow-up checks every 3-6 months for liver hemangioma growth if the liver hemangioma is large.

Treatment for liver hemangioma that causes signs and symptoms . If a liver hemangioma grows large enough to push against nearby structures in the abdomen, it can cause symptoms that signal the need for treatment. Treatment of liver hemangioma depends on the location and size of the liver hemangioma and the patient’s overall health.

If a liver hemangioma grows large enough to push against nearby structures in the abdomen, it can cause symptoms that signal the need for treatment.

The treatments:

  • Surgery to remove liver hemangiomas. If the hepatic hemangioma can be easily separated from the liver, surgery is recommended for removal. Surgery to remove part of the liver, including the liver hemangioma. In some cases, when the hemangioma is in a difficult location, it is necessary to remove part of the liver along with the liver hemangioma.
  • Liver transplant surgery. In very rare situations, if there is a very large liver hemangioma or multiple hemangiomas that cannot be treated by other means, surgery may be recommended to remove the liver and replace it with a new liver. from others.
  • Blocking blood flow to liver hemangioma. Without a blood supply, liver hemangioma may stop growing or shrink. There are two ways to stop the flow of blood.
  • Tying off the main artery (hepatic artery ligation).
  • Injecting medicine into the artery to block it (arterial embolization).
  • Radiation therapy. Radiation therapy uses powerful beams of energy, such as X-rays, to damage the cells of liver hemangioma. This treatment is rarely used.
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